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Your 2-3 day kit... #251664 11/17/08 01:50 AM
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Joe Fowler Offline OP
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I know each person's will be different depending on their knowledge, experience and comfort level... but I am trying to make a very comprehensive list of a good 2-3 day kit (all inclusive).

Like I've said before, I used to go on hikes and camps all the time when I was Sharp's and Cloak's age (one was 75+ miles). I have slept in snow caves, climbed a few peaks in Washington state and walked more switch-tracks with a heavy pack then I'd like to count. The thing is, I haven't done any of that in over 14 years.

I'm trying to get back into it... for myself, my three boys who are growing up very fast and the scout troop I'm involved in locally (these boys need to rough it for a while. They desperately do!)

So, I'm putting my list together and gathering pieces of kit here and there. I could really use some advice on a few things in particular:

What is your cooking setup?

And what is your layering system, clothes wise (please be specific)?

I'm sure I'll have more questions later, but I'm drawing blanks in those two areas.

Also, I asked this in a previous thread but didn't get a whole lot of responses (thank you to those who did!)...

What is your sleeping setup?

Thanks chaps, I really do appreciate it! <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/thumbup.gif" alt="" />


JYD #90 A man carries a knife everyday... even to church.
Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Joe Fowler] #251665 11/17/08 02:27 AM
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Well I actually don't have any portable cook ware as I would most likely just make my self a rack or something over the fire. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" />

But... you can get these small fuel tabs and fuel holders. (I'll get a pic sometime tomorrow). Then you can set a small pan or bowl over it and use the fuel tabs to heat it. This is very minimalist and is very light. If you want something else there is always light butane cookers and you can get pans, etc. for that.

As for a layering system, I'm guessing your talking about really cold conditions.

This is what I would do:

Base layer of UnderArmour Cold Gear - Top and Bottom

Second Layer of Dryfit - Top and Bottom

Third Layer of Fleece - Top, Bottom can be some sort of synthetic pant and interchangeable with the layer of Dryfit.

(of course, you can add more before the final)

The Final Layer of Water, wind, etc. proof Jacket, pants, and a nice wool or synthetic beanie. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" /> Gaiters and warm gloves might also be good to have along.

Ooh, and extra socks are always good to have, too.

Sleeping should be very simple. A small light sleeping bag and a backing will be enough. Since you probably will be sleeping intents with a bottom you won't really need a "cold" sleeping bag (ones that are rated for low temps). Even then, it's a good idea to sleep in your first and second layers to keep warm, maybe even third. As for a pillow, I use my Camelbak. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" />


JYD #54 "Put your hands high, let your arms be the pillars that be holding up the sky..."
Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Sharp] #251666 11/17/08 08:33 AM
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yeah a tent will give you an extra 20 degrees as long as it isn't too heavily vented.

The titanium pots are more expensive but they are a lot lighter and worth it I think. I've used the fuel tabs and they are really light and convenient, but they don't work nearly as well in the wind and take a really long time to boil water. Canister stoves are lighter and more convenient but won't work well at all at low temperatures. They are also pretty wasteful if you are cooking for several people.

I think the white gas or multifuel stoves are the best. I have an MSR Whisperlite International that will work with white gas, kerosene, auto gas or jet fuel. I haven't had any problems with it and I'm very satisfied. The newer stuff might be a little better(maybe not) but the Whisperlite is plenty good enough and half as expensive.

If you are going somewhere you'd have wood fuel available, I think that would be a lot more educational for the kids. I'd just bring some wire to hang your pot on. If there's plenty of rock you could just suspend it over the fire on some rocks, or even make a collapsing wireframe to hold the pot over the fire.


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Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Sharp] #251667 11/17/08 02:50 PM
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Joe Fowler Offline OP
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...Since you probably will be sleeping intents with a bottom you won't really need a "cold" sleeping bag (ones that are rated for low temps)...

So what are we talking about? Would "40 degrees" be sufficient you think?

How about this one?


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Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Joe Fowler] #251668 11/17/08 05:29 PM
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You will be fine with that one. I think that 40 degrees rating is for when you are wearing very little inside that sleeping bag. you can probably do a bit colder than that if you keep some of what you wear during the day on a night.

Another thing is that everyone's body work a bit differently. What is warm for me might not be "warm enough" for another person. 650 fill down has to be pretty warm tho <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" />


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Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Joe Fowler] #251669 11/17/08 05:30 PM
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I've taken my 40F bag down to 20F inside a tent but I leave most of my layers on. a 40F synthetic bag can get all the way down to 2 pounds. If something happened to your zipper you won't freeze to death but you wouldn't be really comfortable either. It will make a difference if you are sharing a tent too.

That bag is meant for summer but you can probably stretch it a long way if you throw in a silk liner and keep most of your layers on. a 20F bag is a lot more versatile if you are going to be out below 20 degrees at all. I have a 0F bag but it is 5 pounds so it doesn't get out much.

Another thing to consider is that down is useless if it is wet. Synthetics will still insulate if they are damp. Down has to get almost completely dry before it will "loft" up again.


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Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Joe Fowler] #251670 11/17/08 10:30 PM
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Quote
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...Since you probably will be sleeping intents with a bottom you won't really need a "cold" sleeping bag (ones that are rated for low temps)...

So what are we talking about? Would "40 degrees" be sufficient you think?

How about this one?

SAR tells me to just wrap myself in all my clothing and an emergency blanket and just deal with it. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" /> We generally can't carry tents and Mt. Hood can be quite cold. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" />

However, that sleeping bag would definitely work well. The tent, as DA stated, will help retain warmth.

If your worried about really cold climates but want to travel light, you can get a light sleeping bag and a sleeping liner.


JYD #54 "Put your hands high, let your arms be the pillars that be holding up the sky..."
Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Sharp] #251671 12/01/08 01:25 AM
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http://www.scrapyardknives.com/ubbthread...;vc=#Post222786 Here is my guide for a 1-3 day winter camping trip.


If you are a friend of the yard, you are a friend of mine. JYD #91
Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Boots] #251672 12/01/08 11:59 AM
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The trick to remember is that you'll want to take off your clothing while you're sleeping; otherwise the sweat your body creates while sleeping will soak into the clothing, diminishing its' thermal capabilities. At the temperatures you guys are talking about, it might not be such a big deal; but if you're talking about the weather we see up north here, it's the difference between life and death.

I have a sleeping bag the reduces to the size of a loaf of bread, and it's good for temperatures down to -10 Celsius (that's about 14 Farenheit for you guys). I have 550 cord and a military "hooch" (essentially a windproof canvas sheet about 10'x6' with tapering triangular ends, available at most army surplus stores) that can be used to make a low profile shelter (closed or open), that you can still hang your clothing from a string at the foot of your sleeping bag. I have a small air mattress that is light and can strap to the outside of my daypack. Again, that'll add warmth to you, since you and the sleeping bag won't be in direct contact with frozen ground.

My little daypack has this and a couple spare bits of clothing (in case I get wet; again freezing temps and water/moisture on body are not a good combo), two days worth of rations, and a camel back with 3 litres of water. There are other little things in there as well; matches, some knives,an axe, a small cooking pot and pan, etc. etc...

You also have to pack for the climate you're travelling in, and for how long you're gonna be out there. 2-3 days isn't so long, but extend that to a week, and your pack is gonna get larger.


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Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: tyger75] #251673 12/02/08 03:28 AM
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excellent thread. I'll play.

Cooking for 3 days is a pop can alcohol stove with a Ti Mug to boil water for dehydrated meals.

Layering is underarmor, then fleece, then a Columbia shell. The pants vary from trip to trip. socks are smartwool.

Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: thesurefire] #251674 12/02/08 04:19 PM
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Joe Fowler Offline OP
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Quote
excellent thread. I'll play.

Cooking for 3 days is a pop can alcohol stove with a Ti Mug to boil water for dehydrated meals.

Layering is underarmor, then fleece, then a Columbia shell. The pants vary from trip to trip. socks are smartwool.

What kind of pants (even what brand)?


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Re: Your 2-3 day kit... [Re: Joe Fowler] #251675 12/02/08 04:54 PM
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Synthetic shirt/pants. That's what I wear for snowshoeing, canyoneering, backpacking, day hikes. For snowshoeing, I wear a Patagonia capilene base layer with Marmot Precip Pants, and a Marmot Cobra shell, this keeps me warm and dry. If it get's too hot, I open vents and or un-zip and use the snaps instead. For canyoneering I wear synthetic shirts pants again, this to keep me cool and dry quick. This year, for snowshoeing I might try a softshell jacket and a capilene base layer, hopefully it does not snow, lol I hear some are waterproof though. I can always put the Marmot Cobra over the softshell. Another option is a base layer, 100 weight fleece, and shell. My Marmot Pre-cip pants are water proof, I could also use the Pre-cip top instead of the Cobra, since it is also waterproof and lighter.


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